Forums  •  Classifieds  •  Events  •  Directory

 

Thimerosal in Vaccines

Listing Details

Visited
328
Read the CDC FAQ on Thimerosal. Thimerosal is a preservative that has been used in some vaccines since the 1930’s, when it was first introduced by Eli Lilly Company. It is 49.6% mercury by weight and is metabolized or degraded into ethylmercury and thiosalicylate. At concentrations found in vaccines, it meets the requirements for a preservative as set forth by the United States Pharmacopeia; that is, it kills the specified challenge organisms and is able to prevent the growth of the challenge fungi. Prior to its introduction in the 1930's, data were available in several animal species and humans providing evidence for its safety and effectiveness as a preservative. Since then, thimerosal has a long record of safe and effective use preventing bacterial and fungal contamination of vaccines, with no ill effects established other than minor local reactions at the site of injection. While the use of mercury-containing preservatives has declined in recent years with the development of new products formulated with alternative or no preservatives, thimerosal is still used in certain antivenins, skin test antigens, and ophthalmic and nasal products, in addition to certain vaccines recommended for adults or older children. As a vaccine preservative it is used in concentrations of 0.003% to 0.01%. A vaccine containing 0.01% thimerosal as a preservative contains 50 micrograms of thimerosal per 0.5 ml dose or approximately 25 micrograms of mercury per 0.5 mL dose.
Rating
0 vote
Favoured:
0
Scroll to top