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Baby Eczema

  1. #9
    hareme is offline Registered User
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    I guess my question is re the type of excema. My son has what the pediatrician described as surface dermatisis. We did all the same things as mentioned, cotton clothes, cool sleeping temps, only bath oils, etc etc... the only thing that helped us was a cream we got from our Dr in OZ as it's one of the only excema treatments without firstly alcohol ( otherwise it stings ) and secondly quartisone ( steroid ).Given that is not available here, my pediatrician recommended to simply use vaseline or sorbelene on his skin when he goes to bed and it helps, admittedly, it's not red raw, or itchy, just dry raised lumps like a rash on his legs and arms.

  2. #10
    Lylah is offline Registered User
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    my son's skin condition varies really... when weather is dry and really hot, skin just shows light rashes, which can also be itchy as he scratches. When it's wet and humid, then that's when it gets really bad... it becomes really irritated.

    I've been on the "home care tips" including after bath vaseline and it seems to be working! Im still crossing my fingers it works long term. Gone are the uneven rashes and he is scratching less now. Hope its not just because the weather has been good in the past couple of days.

    I also have sorbolene from a friend who came from Sydney. But that didn't work with him. Vaseline works better.

  3. #11
    Sean Ma is offline Registered User
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    My son had eczema too when he was 2 months old. We were prescribed elomet which is a stronger steroid than hydrocortisone, which we still use when necessary now (3.5 years). Turns out he was allergic to soy. The moment we cut that from his diet, he's fine. There's a new non-steroidal cream called Tacrolimus (new) which needs to be prescribed. We haven't tried it though, our doctor said it works quite well.

  4. #12
    mummybee is offline Registered User
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    i am also a mum of a (severe) eczema baby. I have been prescribed elomet as well and i use it for bad days, which turns out to be once a week. I am most uncomfortable using it at all, as even my paed told me this is a "big gun" and i should reseve for use of the body but never the face. for those above who are using elomet too, how much do you use and what coverage do you go for? my babys eczema cover almost all of her arms, legs and torso. does this mean i have to put elomet all over her body?? also what type of cortisone cream and what strength do you use? as i said, elomet is for body, and i use 1% sigmacort or 0.5% dermaid for her face.

    i have tried everything - cotton clothing, prevent overheating, use all brands of moisturisers, no soap/detergent etc to control eczema flareup. i am even on an elimination diet since christams last year cutting off several foods. still, nothing seems to work and i am at my wit's end to control scratching.

    thanks in advance for your advice.

  5. #13
    Sean Ma is offline Registered User
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    Hi MummyBee,

    Sorry to hear that about your little one. When my son was a baby, his eczema was only on his face, so we were told to use elomet on his face too. The poor boy would scream everytime we put it on, but because we were able to identity the allergy source (in our case, soy) , we only used it regularly for a short time. Sorry, I can't really remember how long, I guess it must have been on and off for a few months.

    What I do recall was that even I could feel a tingling sensation on my finger tips after applying it on him, so you could imagine how his face felt. As for how much I used, when he was still a baby, I just touched the mouth of the tube with my finger tip (without squeezing the ointment out ) and dab it on his skin.

    As he got older and ate our adult food, the rash moved to his body, so I had to mix elomet with his body cream (we used Stellaotopia) as it was all over the bottom and legs. Our doctor said that using just water for bathing, would strip the oil from his skin and make it even drier (& itchier) so we used the same brand bathing cream / bathing oil (in winter) instead of soap. Our paed also said that if the eczema was too severe, we could try out the new non-steroidal cream which works just as well. Your doctor should be able to tell you about it.

    I hope it gets better for your little one. Don't worry, it does improve with age. My son is 4 years old now and he hasn't had to use his "itchy cream" at all for the past few months. We're keeping our fingers crossed.

  6. #14
    elephantine is offline Registered User
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    mummy bee, sorry to hear about your baby. my little one also has eczema, though milder. It's the type that gets worse in a dry climate (not sure if this is the type that affects your baby), so we found that a humidifier helps. We got ours from Fortress and used it a lot in Nov-Jan, when the air in HK was very dry. If you decide to use one, you will need to clean it with a water/white vinegar mix once a week though, as humidifiers should be cleaned thoroughly and regularly - a bit of a pain but well worth it in our case. I too didn't like using the strong creams but have had to on occasion to stop it getting to the super-irritated and bleeding stage. The rest of the time, I use Mothercare baby lotion (white bottle with pink label) which was highly recommended to me by another parent whose little girl had eczema - this lotion was surprisingly good at keeping my baby's rash manageable. Since it's a non-medicated lotion, I slathered lots of it on my baby several times daily for a couple of weeks and although it didn't eliminate the rash, made a huge improvement. Now I use it just twice a day. I tried plenty of other non-medicated lotions that worked for other babies and not mine though, so I guess it's just a matter of finding something that works your baby. I know how frustrating the trial and error process is - wishing you and your baby lots of luck.

  7. #15
    hunhun is offline Registered User
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    Hi there,

    I talked to a professor who specialise in dermatology in the US half some time ago and I rememerbed that she jokingly say just like fake Shenzhen branded handbags which has A grade and B grades, in medicine you have A grade and B grade too. Elidel, she mentioned is B grade and if you can afford it, you should get Protopic.
    And she also mentioned that lots of people use these medicine on a need basis which is not right, these cream has to be put on everyday including good days continuosely until a whole tube finishes. And she also mentioned that lots of people put too much on each time. One is suppose to use a small grain size and mix it with good moisturising cream like E45 cream and spread it all over the affected area. I remembered she said that if you put small amount of medicine on continuosly until the tube finishes, ezcema will most likely be gone using x grammes of medicine, but if you puts lots on, or you put it on a need basis, you will end up using xxxxgramms of medicine over x number of months or years. She also said NEVER put baby oil on skins that has ezcema as baby oils have perfume. I am no doctor myself, I just want to share what I learnt from her. Anyway, my 3 year old son's ezcema is completely gone by sticking to her advise (which is difficult coz I really didn't want to put any chemical on him, let alone strong ones like the above). Before that my son had visited lots of doctors and specialists, and had tried natural methods as well, but the ezcema kept coming and going. Now it seems to be gone, and I am sooooooo pleased...fingers crossed.

    My son also uses Cetaphil for bathing, and I splat lots of E45 on him after his baths. He took antihistamine syrup (while he was on Protopic). Althouh his skin is now clear, I am still careful with his diet. In his case, not to much soya sauce nor ketchup (which has lots of MSG apparently), no nuts, not too much chocolate....I am not sure if these are the stimulants, it''s just my gut feeling that they are. Well, just in case!

    :bighug
    Last edited by hunhun; 03-31-2006 at 02:13 PM.
    CAILLOU

    CASPER

  8. #16
    hunhun is offline Registered User
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    Here is some informtion that may be of interest to some parents, taken out from Wikipedia:-

    Corticosteroids

    Dermatitis is often treated by doctors with prescribed Glucocorticoid (a corticosteroid steroid) ointments or creams. For mild-moderate eczema a weak steroid may be used (e.g. Hydrocortisone or Desonide), whilst more severe cases require a higher-potency steroid (e.g. Clobetasol propionate). They are highly effective in most cases, but must be used sparingly to avoid possible side effects, the most significant of which is that their prolonged use can cause the skin to thin and become fragile (atrophy). High strength steroids used over large areas may be significantly absorbed into the body causing bone demineralisation (osteoporosis). Finally by their immunosuppression action they can, if used alone, exacerbate some skin infections (fungal or viral).

    Hence a steroid of an appropriate strength to promptly settle an episode of eczema should be sparingly applied. Once the desired response has been achieved, it should be discontinued and not used for long-term prevention.
    [edit]

    Immunomodulators

    Topical immunomodulators like pimecrolimus (Elidel® and Douglan®) and tacrolimus (Protopic®) were developed after corticosteroid treatments, effectively suppressing the immune system in the affected area, and appear to yield better results in some populations. The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a public health advisory about the possible risk of lymph node or skin cancer from use of these products, but many professional medical organizations disagree with the FDA's findings:

    * The postulation is that the immune system may help remove some pre-cancerous abnormal cells which is prevented by these drugs. However, any chronic inflammatory condition such as eczema, by the very nature of increased metabolism and cell replication, has a tiny associated risk of cancer (see Bowen's disease).
    * Current practice by UK dermatologists [1] is not to consider this a significant real concern and they are increasingly recommending the use of these new drugs. The dramatic improvement on the condition can significantly improve the quality of life of sufferers (and families kept awake by the distress of affected children). The major debate, in the UK, has been about the cost of such newer treatments and, given only finite NHS resources, when they are most appropriate to use.[2]
    CAILLOU

    CASPER

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