Forums  •  Classifieds  •  Events  •  Directory

 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

breast to bottle

  1. #9
    mammalicious is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    hong kong
    Posts
    231
    Sarah

    As my baby is still feeding on demand, is it okay if i bring my baby girl along and feed at the meeting should she require?

    thanks!


    many thanks also to Barb!! you'v been so helpful.. i will chk into the links you have sent.

  2. #10
    rani's Avatar
    rani is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Pokfulam, Hong Kong
    Posts
    5,729
    Mamma,

    We gave Dhruv his first bottle at 6 weeks too! I would express 2X a day - mornings and evenings. Would freeze the milk in 3-4oz storage bags.

    Dad was responsible for giving Dhruv his first bottle, there was a bit of protest but he finally took it. I think we used a Nuk bottle. We then continued to give him 1 bottle of expressed milk a day, this was usually at his last feed at 10pm.
    Founder of GeoBaby.Com

  3. #11
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    757
    Babies and toddlers are always welcome at all La Leche League events. Most of the mothers feed their babies during the meetings – after all two hours can be a long time when you’re only a few weeks old.

    In fact the first place I breastfed in public was at an LLL meeting. And after the meeting I was so confident that I met my brother in a large din sum restaurant and fed in public for the second time!

    I hope to see you there,
    SARAH

  4. #12
    mammalicious is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    hong kong
    Posts
    231
    hi Rani

    How did your husband manage to get Druv to take the bottle.. i'm struggling... i expressed some milk after a feed... then my little one would not stop crying. After chking her diaper, cuddling her, we tried the bottle (this was only 40 minutes after the breastfeed) and she would not take the bottle. I had expressed only 1 hour before the breastfeed so we were concerned that perhaps my breast was not full or she felt there was no milk in there to drink.

    she has been screaming so loud that she sounds like she's going to lose her voice.

    i used an avent bottle with the newborn nipple. it seems harder then my nipple of course. but most of the advice i got was that avent nipples are the closest thing to breast nipples. but i'm not having any luck at all.

  5. #13
    barbwong_130 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    467
    Dear Mammalicious,

    You said,”I had expressed only 1 hour before the breastfeed so we were concerned that perhaps my breast was not full or she felt there was no milk in there to drink.”

    The breast is not a bottle and breastfeeding doesn’t work like bottle feeding.

    With bottle feeding we fill up a bottle all at once and when we give it to the bay it is full and after the baby has drunk it is empty until we fill it up again – usually at the next feed.

    The breast, however, is never empty and it can’t be filled up immediately. If everything is going well with breastfeeding then the breast will be part full the whole time. When the baby drinks and the amount of milk in the breast is reducing then the breast starts to make milk faster.

    So if the breast is full and the baby takes ½ oz the time to replace this milk is much longer than the time taken to replace ½ oz when the breast is nearing empty.

    So even if you could have taken all the milk out of your breast one hour before a feed impossibility) your breast would have made milk very fast and so there would be enough for the baby when she wanted to feed an hour later.

    It is very normal for babies to ask for more breastfeeding only 40 minutes after the last feed – this doesn’t mean she didn’t get milk at the previous feed. This might have happen for lots of reasons – maybe she wanted an after dinner treat (I like chocolate cake after my dinner) or maybe she is having a growth spurt and needs to feed more often to get more milk to grow more.

    And if you baby is upset it is NOT the time to introduce something new to her. Introduce bottle feeding when she isn’t tired, hungry or upset.

    Best wishes,
    Barb

  6. #14
    mammalicious is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    hong kong
    Posts
    231
    Barb

    thanks again for the info.. i also have a concern... i thought i had an adequate amount of milk supply.. or so the midwives told me at the matilda... also my baby has gained weight at her 2 week chk up. i'm only using the manual avent isis pump, which i thought was fine.. but i'm only able to express 1.5oz (40ml)after my feed... i don't pump until after a feed. i thought i had managed to express more with an electric pump. in any case... at 3 weeks now (baby's age) should i be able to express much more than that? i noticed some of the other ladies in this chat said they could express 3-4 oz!!

    thanks

    mamma

  7. #15
    mammalicious is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    hong kong
    Posts
    231
    Barb

    or anyone else who may be able to answer me or direct me to a link that may offer me some info... is there somewhere i can find out how much milk my baby will take at 3 weeks... 4 weeks etc etc so i know how much approximately to warm in a bottle (expressed breast milk) for each feed. you mentioned a 2 week old takes about 45-60ml per feed.. where do i find this info pls?

    i assume formula cans offer info but as the content of formula differs and fills the baby's tummy longer, that i cannot follow that as a guideline?

  8. #16
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    757
    Hi Mammalicious,

    You have raised a number of issues. I will try to answer them.

    First pumping is not the same as breastfeeding. The amount of milk you get from pumping is not the amount you have – it is only the amount you managed to get out by pumping. Your baby will get a lot more milk when breastfeeding directly from you than you can pump out.

    When a mother returns to work and pumps her milk at work her body is ready and expecting to give the milk to the baby (although some mothers still find this hard work). But when you are breastfeeding your baby AND asking your body to express more it is very hard work indeed.

    Being able to express 1.5 oz is already very good. If you need more simply express on more occasions and add the milk together. In this respect expressing is like breastfeeding - the more you do it with more milk you will get. Thus if you express six times for 10 minutes you’ll get more milk than it you express once for an hour.

    When you breastfeed directly three things are working together to help the milk leave your body and enter the baby’s body.
    • Your hormone levels are raised, especially oxytocin. Oxytocin helps the milk ejection reflex – this is the reflex that squeezes the milk out of the aveoli, the milk producing cells, and pushes it into the ducts which take the milk to your nipple. When you pump or hand express the levels of oxytocin are much lower.
    • The baby uses suction to help the milk come out – the pump tries to duplicate this but hand expression doesn’t.
    • The baby’s mouth milks the breast with its tongue and jaw movements. Hand expression tries to duplicate this but the pump doesn’t.

    On top of this many mothers have difficulty getting the let-down to work well when pumping. It works with no trouble when the baby is breastfeeding directly but doesn't seem to work at all when using the pump.

    Many things that don’t matter when breastfeeding directly can affect the quantity when pumping. For example, how tried you feel and how much stress you are under.

    You can also encourage the let-down reflex artificially, by looking at your baby, or by having a piece of his clothing next to you.
    • Apply a warm wet cloth to your breasts.
    • Massage the breasts in small circular motions around the perimeter of the breast.
    • Gently stroke your breasts with your fingernails in a downward motion toward the nipple
    • Lean forward and gently shake the breasts.
    • Gently roll the nipple between your finger and thumb.

    It may help to try a hand expression technique called the Marmet Technique, http://www.lactationinstitute.org/MANUALEX.html
    This is useful because it helps the let-down and so you get more milk.

    (Please note that the diagram of the breast anatomy is out of date. Recent research has discovered that the milk reservoirs under the areola (the dark coloured part of the breast near the nipple) do not exist. The method, however, still works.)

    Some mothers have found that the pumps are not good at getting the let-down to happen and so they use hand expression until the let-down and then swap to pumping. You can also use the times at the end of the Marmet Technique, including the massage, stroke and shake but instead of doing the hand expression use the pump.

    Different pumps work differently for different mothers. There is an article called, How Do I Choose a Breast Pump? http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/pump.html which explains the differences.

    A one month old full breastfed baby will drink about 750 ml a day. A six month old full breastfed baby will also drink about 750 ml a day. This is one of the big differences between a breastfed baby and an artificially fed baby. The amount of milk the baby drinks each day remains the same.

    This is because breast milk changes. It changes from the beginning of the feed to the end of the feed. It changes from the beginning of the day to the end of the day. And it changes as the baby grows older.

    In fact I’ve just been sent this link, http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/st...ectID=10345723, which is an article in a New Zealand newspaper which tells that breast milk of older babies is higher in fat content than breast milk of younger babies.

    Artificial milk does not do this. This milk is always the same no matter whether you make it in the morning or in the evening or whether you make it when the baby is one month old or six months old. Because of this the calorie content is always the same. This means that the only way to get more calories into the baby is to give more milk. Thus an artificially fed six month old baby drinks a lot more milk than an artificially fed one month old baby.

    Your question, however, was how to tell how much a baby will want at a particular feed? This is a “how long is a piece of string” question. It is too difficult to answer because each baby is different and each feed is different.

    Generally the advice is to store the milk in small qualities. That way you can give the baby an ounce at a time until the baby doesn’t want any more. It is easy to add more milk if the baby is still hungry. But if you heat 6oz of milk for the baby and he only drinks 1 oz then you have just wasted 5 oz.

    It you are dealing with fresh milk only using a bit at a time is easy. (And remember that breast milk can keep in the fridge for a long time – up to 7 days.). One mother in our group who was freezing her milk for longer storage used an ice cube tray to freeze it in. Once frozen she kept them in a plastic bag – this way she could easily get exactly the amount she wanted.

    The article What are LLLI's guidelines for storing my pumped milk?, http://www.lalecheleague.org/FAQ/milkstorage.html, gives the LLLI guidelines for storing human milk.

    Best wishes,
    SARAH
    La Leche League Leader
    [email protected]
    2548-7636

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Tips on moving from breast to bottle
    By JandIinHK in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-10-2008, 02:27 PM
  2. weaning from breast to bottle
    By jamesandsimo in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-02-2007, 07:21 AM
  3. Baby refusing both breast and bottle!
    By Graham in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-17-2006, 10:55 AM
  4. breast to bottle/sippy cup
    By bbc mom in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-09-2006, 09:30 AM
  5. Breast to Bottle
    By Joyce in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-01-2005, 12:45 AM

Tags for this Thread

Scroll to top