Forums  •  Classifieds  •  Events  •  Directory

 
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

HELP NEEDED! Sleep for a 4.5 month old

  1. #1
    babi77's Avatar
    babi77 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Macau
    Posts
    55

    HELP NEEDED! Sleep for a 4.5 month old

    Dear Friends,

    My baby 4.5 months old, sleep schedule is kind of below:

    Morning nap - 9:30 to 11:30
    Afternoon nap - 2:00pm to about 5:00pm (with crying or need cradling along)
    Evening - only maybe take a cat nap from 7:00pm to 8:00pm

    then the problem arise, he'll be so fussy at about 9:00pm till 11:00pm, then I must nurse him at about 11:00pm and put him down on his bed at midnight, and then he'll wake up at 5am

    I believe he's sleeping too few, I mean the night sleep, I know some babies can sleep from 10pm to 8am, but for sure, that's not my kid. After he wakes up at 5am, he will sleep again from 6:30am to maybe 8:00 am and then the whole routine set in again.

    Also he's so fussy before sleeping, must cradle, rock or nurse, until he';s totally asleep, so each time is kind of like 2hours sleep battle.

    After reading other board messages, I'm wondering, should I really put him on his bed and let him cry on his own....you know as a mother, is really sometimes hard to listen him crying...

    PLS HELP US! Nanny and mother are exhausted already

    Babi

  2. #2
    carang's Avatar
    carang is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sai Kung
    Posts
    6,259
    it may be that your child is too tired...it is difficult for babies that are too tired to fall asleep... maybe try putting him to bed earlier... and not wait until he fusses...

  3. #3
    babi77's Avatar
    babi77 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Macau
    Posts
    55
    actually we put him down not before he's too tired, for instance he wakes up for 1 hour or 1.5, we already try putting him to sleep, but still he's like this.. PLS HELP!

  4. #4
    scr
    scr is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Kowloon
    Posts
    182
    It does seem like your baby is sleeping too less for his age. Mainly it looks like he's taking too long to sleep. Maybe you could try a routine that is exactly the same every night. If he's going to be fussy from 9:00 then start the routine earlier. Maybe 8:30. If he is not sleeping well between 7:00 to 8:00 then maybe you should use that time for the routine and put him down for the night.
    You could try including a few of the following :
    A warm calm bath,
    massaging,
    reading books,
    singing songs,
    playing soft music,
    rocking,
    nursing.
    Do it in dim lights and the last step (i guess nursing) in the dark. Keep the same steps every night and he'll begin to know it is bed time. Try to stop nursing when the baby is awake but very sleepy so he learns to fall asleep on his own. This will take time but it is gentler than letting him cry it out which I assume you don't want to do.
    Is he sleeping without waking up from 12:00 to 5:00 am ? Then he is sleeping 'through the night' . But maybe you can try to train him to settle himself so that he sleeps quickly after feeding instead of sleeping at 6:30 am.

    Good luck. These tips are from Elizabeth Pantley's book the no-cry sleep solution. Hope it works for you

  5. #5
    Zen
    Zen is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Tai Tam
    Posts
    49

    Question

    How many hours should a 4-mth old be sleeping?

  6. #6
    carang's Avatar
    carang is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sai Kung
    Posts
    6,259
    i copied this from the following website:
    http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.js...icle_set=10233

    The First 6 Months

    There is no sleep formula for newborns because their internal clocks aren't fully developed yet. They generally sleep or drowse for 16 to 20 hours a day, divided about equally between night and day.

    Newborns should be awakened every 3 to 4 hours until their weight gain is established, which typically happens within the first couple of weeks. After that, it's OK if a baby sleeps for longer periods of time. But don't get your slumber hopes up just yet — most infants won't snooze for extended periods of time because they get hungry.

    Newborns' longest sleep periods are generally 4 or 5 hours — this is about how long their small bellies can go between feedings. If newborns do sleep for a while, they will likely be extra hungry during the day and may want to nurse or get the bottle more frequently.

    Just when parents feel that sleeping through the night seems like a far-off dream, their baby's sleep time usually begins to shift toward night. At 3 months, a baby averages 5 hours of sleep during the day and 10 hours at night, usually with an interruption or two. About 90% of babies this age sleep through the night, meaning 6 to 8 hours in a row.

    But it's important to recognize that babies aren't always awake when they sound like they are; they can cry and make all sorts of other noises during light sleep. Even if they do wake up in the night, they may only be awake for a few minutes before falling asleep again on their own. It's best if babies learn early to get themselves to sleep, so let your baby try.

    If a baby under 6 months old continues to cry for several minutes, it's time to respond. Your baby may be genuinely uncomfortable: hungry, wet, cold, or even sick. But routine nighttime awakenings for changing and feeding should be as quick and quiet as possible. Don't provide any unnecessary stimulation, such as talking, playing, or turning on the lights. Encourage the idea that nighttime is for sleeping. You have to teach this because your baby doesn't care what time it is as long as his or her needs are met.

    Ideally, your baby should be placed in the crib before falling asleep. And it's not too early to establish a simple bedtime routine. Any soothing activities, performed consistently and in the same order each night, can make up the routine. Your baby will associate these with sleeping, and they'll help him or her wind down. You want your child to fall asleep independently, and a routine encourages babies to go back to sleep if they should wake up in the middle of the night.

  7. #7
    carang's Avatar
    carang is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sai Kung
    Posts
    6,259
    and this from the following website....
    http://elcaminopediatrics.com/health...sleep_0304.htm


    Teaching Your Four Month Old to
    Sleep Through the Night
    (March 2004)

    Four-month-old infants are old enough and big enough to sleep through the night. They are capable of sleeping for a full 10 hours at a stretch by this age and will nap two, or even three, times a day. Some children do seem to need less sleep than others, but a minimum of nine hours at night should be encouraged. Good, uninterrupted sleep will ensure rested parents who have a lot more energy for their children and more time for each other.

    Choosing to sleep...

    Families that choose to sleep with their children in a “family bed” should now begin to ensure that their baby knows how to fall asleep without them. Baby can fall asleep in the family bed but shouldn’t have to rely on Mommy or Daddy’s presence. It should go without saying that the family bed has to be safe for the baby. Complete edge barriers, a firm mattress and no comforter until parents are in bed, and are just some of the safety requirements. Parents may want to consider putting baby down in a crib in the room and then taking baby to bed with them when they are ready to retire for the night. Couples should definitely spend some time thinking about whether they will both want their 3 or 4 year old to sleep in bed with them! Set up the sleeping arrangements now in a way that will work in the long term, and make sure that both parents agree on these issues.

    By four months of age some babies have already learned how to fall asleep alone while others are being “parented” to sleep, i.e. a parent is present with them as they drift off. Infants who rely on the presence of a parent to fall asleep will almost certainly wake their parents during the night. When these babies wake up during the night, as they all will, they need to re-create the situation that comforts them and allows them to fall back to sleep. Four months olds will sometimes sleep through the night even when they have been rocked or nursed to sleep but as they reach the next phase of emotional development (separation and development of self) they will start to demand the presence of a parent in the middle of the night. This will usually start to surface by 6 to 9 months of age as separation anxiety becomes more pronounced.

    It is important to establish a nighttime routine, but parents should complement this with daytime separation as well. Avoid constantly holding the baby and encourage experience with people other than the immediate family. A good way to create a nighttime routine is to feed baby dinner, and then give a bath. The bath is not only relaxing, but also separates eating and sleeping so that food does not become part of the way in which baby falls asleep. After the bath, babies are nice and warm and snuggly and a few minutes of rocking in a chair or reading or singing to them is soothing. After this brief session, say goodnight and put baby down in a crib in his or her own room or into the family bed. Briefly settle baby and then leave the room.

    If baby cries, look at your watch and wait a minute. This is sometimes called the longest minute in the world! At the end of the minute go into the room with a very sleepy attitude, speak in a whisper and don’t turn on the lights. Tell baby that everything is OK but that it’s time to sleep. You can gently pat them or rock the crib but don’t actually pick baby up. Then say goodnight and leave the room again. If the crying starts up again or if your brief interaction didn’t settle baby, then wait for five minutes before you go in again. It really is important to use a clock to measure the 5 minutes. After 5 minutes go back into the room but this time don’t touch baby at all, just use a soothing voice. Tell them once again that everything is OK but that it’s still time to sleep and then leave the room. Take about 20 to 30 seconds to talk soothingly from the door of the room. If baby continues to cry, wait for a full 10 minutes before going back in.

    Once again, just use your voice to reassure baby that you are there.
    Some babies seem to cry more loudly or more angrily when they hear Mom or Dad’s voice and are still not picked up. Don’t be discouraged by this. The message you are giving is that you are ignoring baby but that you have not abandoned or deserted them. In other words you are using this technique to teach the baby and not to punish.

    In general, infants at this age will fall asleep during the 5 or 10 minute crying period. If your baby persists, however, you have to be willing to outlast the crying. Wait for 15 minutes and again use your voice before waiting a full 20-minutes. If needed go on to a 25-minute period, and then return every 30 minutes to use your voice to reassure baby that all is well with the world and that you are nearby.

    If baby has cried for an hour or more and you give in and pick baby up, you are teaching that enough crying will eventually get you to come back in. Some babies become hoarse, get red or sweaty, and some will even vomit. If you make the mistake of responding to this they will be sure to do it for you again the next time!

    If and when baby wakes up during the night, don’t respond for the first minute. If the crying persists, go and check to make sure that nothing is wrong and then launch into the 5-minute crying period. Follow this with a ten-minute period and so on.

    In most cases, infants will continue to cry at bed time or wake up during the night for as long as a week. It often only takes a night or two, and then the whole family can look forward to solid, uninterrupted sleep for years to come.

    Written by Nick Levy, M.D.

  8. #8
    carang's Avatar
    carang is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sai Kung
    Posts
    6,259
    hope that helps!!!

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-23-2009, 10:23 PM
  2. Screaming/ Crying before sleep in 5 month old
    By yuukalim0404 in forum Sleep and your Baby
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-16-2009, 08:15 PM
  3. 1 month old - refuses to sleep when parents are minding her.
    By Paddington in forum Sleep and your Baby
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-17-2008, 04:13 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-31-2007, 07:05 PM
  5. Much needed sleep!
    By bailey in forum Everything Else
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-26-2005, 09:37 AM

Tags for this Thread

Scroll to top