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Cup feed or bottle feed???

  1. #1
    cyberyoda is offline Registered User
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    Cup feed or bottle feed???

    I am a first time Mum and just delivered a baby for 10 days. There is a saying that for those who try to breastfeed should CUP FEED formula to baby if they need supplement BUT NOT BOTTLE FEED. This is because bottle feed can leads to nipple confusion that baby may refuse breast nipple if they were given a bottle before. Is this saying true.

    My baby has not regain his initial birth weigth so I have to supplement formula for him while my milk supply has not yet well established. I have been CUP FEEDING him due to the above reason. But this cause him to swallon too much gas and take us a long time to feed too. Sometimes, I also worry about choking but this happens only twice and was very minor.

    I still have to supplement at the moment...should I continue to cup feed or actually bottle feed is ok??

    Thanks for any advice

  2. #2
    mailmail is offline Registered User
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    My expererience is that I bottle fed and breast fed at the same time and there wasn't any nipple confusion. In the public hospital, my baby was fed with different bottles, nipples and formula, (as well as breastfed as well), depending on what formula, bottles or teats were available at the time. So, I think you should do a trial and error, buy a small bottle and see if it works. Maybe your baby doesn't have a preference at all, maybe he does, try!

  3. #3
    littlebuddha is offline Registered User
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    My milk supply was not sufficient in the beginning, so after a week or two our paediatrician recommended to supplement with formula. I made a few desperate attempts with a syringe and then switched to a bottle. My boy never had any problems switching between breast and bottle. I took care always to breastfeed first and give the bottle afterwards to teach him that breastfeeding was the main way to get his milk. I could stop supplementing after two or three months and continued breastfeeding until my baby's first birthday. Because he was used to the bottle, we never had any difficulties bottlefeeding him when I was away and when weaning him from the breast.

    Of course every baby is different, but if you need to supplement and the cup feeding does not work well, I would say switch to the bottle for your baby's and your own sake.

  4. #4
    JennyB is offline Registered User
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    The reason why bottle feeding is not recommended when you are trying to establish is that there is a high RISK that they will get nipple confusion. That is not to say that all babies will get nipple confusion. I have no idea what the percentages are. It's probably impossible to get accurate figures. But that fact is that nipple confusion is very common, so why take the risk if you can avoid it?

    I can imagine how difficult it is having to cope with supplementation problems as well as deal with all the other newborn issues! I think the best way to solve your supplementation dilemma is to minimise the need for them, by making sure your baby is breastfeeding effectively. See a lactation consultant or LLL leader if you haven't already. Even a small improvement in latching can make a huge difference to your baby's need for supplements.

    I had lots of problems with engorgement in the early days with my first baby, and none whatsoever with my second baby, which I put down to the fact that my second baby's latch must have been much better - she was so much more efficient at draining the breast.

  5. #5
    cyberyoda is offline Registered User
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    I have met with the latation consultant. My problem is I have some blocked duct which I am now under medication (approved by doctor) to solove it. Latation consultant also did massage to help encourage smoother flow of my milk so as to help increase milk supply. Another problem, my baby is a bit pre-mature and he is extrememly sleepy. He can normally nurse seriously for 5-10 minutes and then he fall asleep. And then he cry within 5 mins after we put him down. I then nurse again for 5-10 mins and he totally fall asleep regardless of me trying different ways to wake him. This whole process keep on adn on for more than an hour...still he does not get enough milk. I have to supplement him at teh end...there seems no effective way to wake him even I tried all teh methods suggested by latation consultant adn doctors.

    I am using the Medela electronic pump but it is not effective in draining my milk cause I am not engorge at all. I amy need to go buy another Avent hand pump which was recommended by many others.... appreciate any share of experience if any Mum has came across similar problem on breastfeeding. And the pump is important too. Hope teh Avent one can work. Otherwise, it take me an hour to hand express (much more than what I got from Medela)...but again, very time-consuming and I dont have much time to sleep...

  6. #6
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
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    It is very difficult to know where introducing bottles too soon will affect an individual baby but generally it is a big problem in getting breastfeeding working well. One research study I read said that 95% of babies (that is 19 babies out of 20) will encounter problems if given bottles in the first three weeks of life.

    It is important that your baby learn to breastfeed well before bottles or pacifiers are introduced. Some babies learn to breastfeed very quickly and others take more time. Obvious if your baby is one of the quick ones to learn to breastfeed the introduction of don’t have a big effect. But if your baby is having problems breastfeeding then introducing bottles will just complicate everything.

    As your baby is still so young and things aren’t prefect yet it would be best to assume tat your baby isn’t breastfeeding in the best way yet and avoid bottles if possible.

    Dr. Jack Newman believes that if the baby is latching on to the breast then the best way to supplement the baby is with a lactation aid aid and not cup feeding. A lactation aid allows you to supplement the baby at the breast. Remember that babies learn to breastfeed by breastfeeding not by cup feeding.

    There are instructions for using a lactation aid at, http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/5.html

    here is also a video on the web page http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/newman.shtml
    Under the title Lactation Aid.

    (In this video Dr Newman just uses the tube and puts it straight into the bottle. This works just as well as the SNS (Supplemental Nursing System) that Medela sell but it doesn't look as nice. Obviously for Medela to sell them to mothers more design had to go into it!)

    If you want to buy a supplementer ask for "Supplemental Nursing System" or a SNS.
    There is a picture of one at http://www.meridianhk.com.hk/special_feeding_main.html

    Medela also sell the feeding tube #8F and you can just get this and use the same method as Dr. Jack Newman if you want.

    You can get them from Meridian or Celki shops in Hong Kong

    Meridian Hong Kong Limited
    Head Office
    21/F., Tins Enterprises Centre, 777 Lai Chi Kok Road,
    Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    Tel: (852) 2328 2662 Fax: (852) 2358 0263
    Email : [email protected]

    The secret to cup feeding is not to remove the cup from the baby’s lips when you are feeding her the milk. Just tip the cup slightly so a small amount goes into the baby’s mouth.

    I, personally, find the Medela soft cup feeder much easier.
    http://www.meridianhk.com.hk/special_feeding_main.html
    This is the same as spoon feeding the baby but it avoids the spillage. And again the secret is to not remove the feeder from the baby’s mouth as you feed.

    Try to get someone else to cup feed the baby for you. As this will relieve you and allow you to pump during the time the baby is feeding.

    It is normal for cup feeding to take a long time. After all your baby would be breastfeeding for a long time if she was getting all her milk that way. The fact that the baby gets her milk very quickly when bottle feeding is one of the reasons that baby’s have difficulty learning to breastfeed and bottle feed at the same time.

    The usual recommendation is to delay introducing bottles until the baby is 4 to 6 weeks old, or at least two weeks after all breastfeeding problems have been solved.

    Best wishes,
    SARAH

  7. #7
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
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    When a baby is having difficulty staying interested in the breast and is getting sleepy. It often means that the baby isn’t able to stimulate the breast enough to maintain your supply. In these cases it is very important to pump or express to maintain the supply until such a time that the baby has matured enough to do the job herself.

    Usually we suggest feeding that baby and doing Breast Compression and Switch Nursing. This will allow your baby to get as much milk as possible in the feed. Then pump or express after the feed. Keep expressing until two minutes after the milk has stopped flowing. But remember that it is better to do lots of short pumpings rather than one long one. (Pumping six times for ten minutes is much better than one pumping for an hour.)

    Dr. Jack Newman also explains how to do Breast Compression on his web site, http://www.drjacknewman.com/

    Breast Compression at http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/15pdf.pdf

    He also has video clips on his web site which can be useful
    Go to http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/newman.shtml
    and click on Second Latch, Compression and Compression Two
    and show the Breast Compression technique.
    (scroll down the page - everythingis in alphabetical order.)

    Another good technique is Switch Nursing. Switch nursing is changing to the other side when the baby no longer seems interested. Usually when we start feeding the baby is very interested to suck, as the baby slows down we start the breast compression and when the baby slows down with the breast compression we change and get the baby to have the other side. On the other side after the baby starts to slow down we again use the breast compression and when he slows down again swap back to the first side again. We can continue swapping sides as much as we like and for as long as the baby is willing to continue to suck. It is fine to swap sides 8, 9 or 10 times in one feed.

    All this information is difficult to take in and talking to someone or better a face-to-face meeting will help.

    Even though your baby is managing to breastfeed a little you may also find the following links helpful.

    Breastfeeding your Premature Infant
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/preemie/index.html

    Establishing and maintaining milk supply when baby is not nursing
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/ma...pply-pump.html

    I'm not pumping enough milk. What can I do?
    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/p..._decrease.html
    especially the section How can I increase pumping output?

    Best wishes,
    SARAH
    Last edited by LLL_Sarah; 03-29-2007 at 07:51 AM. Reason: Correct the link

  8. #8
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
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    Sorry the Lactaion Aid link above is wrong. It should be http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/5pdf.pdf

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