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Your Child's Reading ability

  1. #9
    aussiegal is offline Registered User
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    Also, just wanted to second what Fee said. In the long run does it make a difference if your child reads at 3, 4, 5, 6 etc. They all learn in the end.

    I think that too often parents want the child to hit milestones early, not for the child's benefit but for the parent's ego. Children need to be left to be kids as long as possible and play is the most important thing. Socialising your children should also be a priority. Otherwise you get a smart kid who doesn't fit in, doesn't know how to make friends and there can't be much worse than that.

  2. #10
    Bubbly is offline Registered User
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    I started my baby on the Doman flash cards when she was 3 mths, and she really enjoys them! I do it in a way so that it's a fun game to play and she laughs everytime I bring them out.

    Although there is no way of knowing whether or not she can read the words or not, but what I do know is that it is our playtime together and something we both enjoy doing.

    When using the flash cards, you must not force your child/baby to do it. Only do it when you are both in a good and happy mood. What you do not want to do is to give your child the impression that flash cards/ reading is a boring chore. Always stop BEFORE your child has had enough.

    I do have friends who attend classes at KinderU and their children seem to be able to read at the age of 12 mths, so you could always give it a go, but they also ask parents to practise at home with their children as you cannot expect your child to learn if you only attend an one hour class each week!

    Read Glenn Doman's 'How to teach your baby to read' and you can understand a bit more the principal behind his methods!

  3. #11
    Linda&Hanley is offline Registered User
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    I definitely don't fancy scenes of young children reading word cards and books for most of their activity time. As a playgroup teacher I firmly believe in learning through play, which is the philosophy guiding my own lessons. Yet if we're talking about 10 minutes reading cards and another 10 minutes reading books every day, then my question would be: why not give our children a head start when they can manage it so effortlessly, especially in considering the fact that like the acquisition of verbal languages, this window of learning doesn't open for long?

    By the way, why should we teach children ABCs, numbers and shapes but not words if, to them, none is more difficult than the others?

    Linda

  4. #12
    aussiegal is offline Registered User
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    I'm sorry Bubbly i just don't believe a child can 'read' at 12 months of age. They might have rote learnt what they 'read' back to you but that would be about it. Maybe and this is a big maybe, there are one or two kids who can but that would be about it. Next everyone will be telling me that my 18 month old should be doing my taxes this year.

    The thing i find most amusing about Hong Kong is this incredible drive by parents to get their kids into all sorts of programmes, schools etc when they are so young. It's all about what they can achieve, which milestone they can reach ahead of schedule. And for this they are willing to pay big bucks and give their children schedules that would challenge many adults.

    In Australia we are far more relaxed and give children more time to be children. My child is a normal kid I would say. Sat at 6 months, crawled at 8, walked at 12. At 18 months he talks all day long though i can't understand a hell of a lot.He has a good vocab however so i understand when he decides to use one or two words at a time. He understands a lot and can follow instructions well. He is well socialised etc But he can't read, he can't say the alphabet, he can't count to ten and you know what, I don't care. It will come. Both my husband and I are college educated and have successful careers. I'm pretty sure my husband didn't read at 12 months, i know i didn't. More than anything I want a happy child and one that doesn't kill himself when he's 16 because he has failed a test or kill others because he's never learnt to socialise. yeah, these are extremes and it's not bad to want your child to read early etc but people need to keep some perspective and make sure it's not at the expense of other important abilities.

  5. #13
    joannek is offline Registered User
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    cemily, if you keep minding who's kid can do what at what age & wonder if your child is normal to whether or not do those things at that age, you'll drive yourself nuts before your kid reach 7. as long as your kid reach all healthy milestones, healthy & happy, i think he's fine.

    children who spent their first 5 years playing, imagining characters, pretending to be pirates & princesses, etc instead of writing in copy books & doing mathematics, in fact, score higher academically when they're 10, compare to those who spent went to academic kindergartens. i read it in one of the Waldorf Steiner books.

    My friend told me that her daughter was illiterate at 6, when she started primary school, cos she went to Highgate House (a Waldorf schoo)l, where they don't teach character recognition. Her classmates who went to Montessori & other kindergartens could read & write at 6. So I asked her, by the 2nd year, did she catch up? she said, "yes". so does it matter if she could read & write at 6? no. but note that her teacher say she's obviously more confident & participate more in class than her peers.

    so don't worry about whether who could read or write at 3 or 5!

  6. #14
    Lolipop is offline Registered User
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    An interesting point to make also is that the 'Germans' and 'Swiss' are renound for their academic minds and their brilliant efficiency (now I know this is a sterio type, but steriotypes do come from somewhere).

    Both of those nations do not start school until they are 6yrs old, and at kindergarten the emphasis is on learning through play!

    I have a German husbnd who is incredibly intelligent, efficient and actually all of the steriotypes LoL

    ... Don't the Swiss have the actual highest rate of school performance as well - not sure where I heard that from, I will probably look it up (because I am a bit anal like that LoL)

    xxx

  7. #15
    Lolipop is offline Registered User
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    stereotype* (spelling was never my strongest ability LoL)

  8. #16
    Lolipop is offline Registered User
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    Right ok, so kick me up the bum for not getting my facts right!

    It is Finland, not Switzerland!

    "...Foreign educators in droves want to visit Finnish schools for the simple reason that they are so good -- very likely the best on Earth."

    "...Finland finishes first in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) exams that test 15-year-olds in all of the world's industrial democracies. Finland also finishes at or near the top in many global comparisons of economic competitiveness: Internet usage, environmental practices and more. Finland, where the modern cell phone was largely invented, has more cell phones per capita than any other nation -- nearly 85 per 100 citizens.

    "....... The Finns long ago decided that 7 is the right age to begin school, so in every grade the children are a year older than they would be in the United States. Six-year-olds have kindergarten (and a high percentage of Finnish youngsters come to school from state-run day-care centers, which are also generously staffed and supported). But according to Raili Rapila, a kindergarten teacher at Arabia, there is no pressure to begin reading before the first grade. Three of 10 in her class are readers, she said, but all 10 love to be read to, and are often, every day. "Social skills and learning to play are more important than reading" for the 6-year-olds, she said."

    These are just a few quotes ... the full article you can find http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...052301622.html

    xxx

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