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Phonics taught at Kindies here??

  1. #17
    educator is offline Registered User
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    can start early

    As one who has been trained in multiple phonics curriculum and have studied early childhood education, you can start kids off in phonics as early as 2 yrs old and yield results. Believe it or not, you might even get better results if you start early.

    I won't endorse any particular place or system, but these factors DO MATTER. As you're looking into this, you might want to make sure you the instructor is either American (or Canadian) accent or UK accent. This changes things a bit. American is probably best since it follows phonics rules a bit more.

    Also, phonics systems do matter too. The most common in hk is Jolly Phonics followed by Letterland. Both are decent, but not so great compared to more advanced and proven effective systems that have come out from other publishers. And JP is British so just know that it's already biased for the British Accent in multiple cases.
    Ed

    :yeah2

  2. #18
    HappyV is offline Registered User
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    I have to laugh at 'educator's comments.
    Phonics is about everyday speech sounds being linked to a visual stimuli. Hence, what children hear at home is going to be as much of (probably more!) an influence than whether a teacher is Australian, Canadian or English. Not much point ufssing over whther the teacher is Canadian or UK if the child hears Indian/Cantonese/manadrin accebted English at home - that's the accent they'll grow up with. Good phonic instruction can be interventionalist in its nature, and certaibly certain word pronounciation can be modified......

    Actually,there is research arguing that that Irish has the pronounciation closest to a 'pure' phonic concept. If anyone wants their kids to learn English and send them to Ireland, be my guest!
    Last edited by HappyV; 06-23-2008 at 06:31 PM. Reason: spelling

  3. #19
    bekyboo44 is offline Registered User
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    I think the general consensus is that Letterland is largely outdated.

    And the best phonics programmes are those that teach 'synthetic phonics,' e.g. Jolly Phonics.

    If you plan to teach your own child phonics at hme, then it is best to find out what programme/method will be used in their primary sch and go with that, so that there is consistency in their teaching and learning.

    It would also be worth taking a course/studying phonics, and the teaching and learning of it, to make sure you are doing the best thing for your child.

    And ultimately to keep reading, reading and reading to your child!

  4. #20
    HappyV is offline Registered User
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    Agreed 100% about the reading. And not just books - street signs, the cereal packet, the labels on the milk - everything that makes them understand that words contain the world. :)

  5. #21
    cwbmum is offline Registered User
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    Just some points I want to add regarding the above comments on phonics. I am a trainer for JP and haven't got anything bad to say about letterland or any other phonic tool taught.
    I believe that children learn at different levels, some children find with JP the sound is remembered by the action first, they enjoy the songs, actions and will probably do the action when they see the letter, they soon stop this though and just see the action in their heads but say the sound out aloud. Also blending is taught straigtaway so children are able to read up to 40 words from group 1 sounds alone.
    After teaching JP in HK for 9 years I have found it works really well.

    1. Jolly Phonics is specifically designed for both British and North American English. For instance, on the website www.jollylearning.co.uk (under 'Audio') teachers can hear all the letter sounds in either accent. There is no 'bias for the British Accent' even if that were possible.

    2. Jolly Phonics is much the most popular phonics programme in Canada being used by 35% of elementary schools there. The US is our second largest market (though the overall usage is lower than in Canada). Jolly Phonics has been successful for teachers around the world.

    3. Neither British nor American spellings follow phonic 'rules' well. This is especially true for common early words like 'said', 'was' and 'once'. The relatively few differernt spellings in American English will be no significant help for children learning to read.

  6. #22
    educator is offline Registered User
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    Having taught phonics in Hong Kong with multiple systems in multiple schools, both International and Local) for many years and also managed a group of teachers from both UK and US for a large educational company, I just question the value of Jolly Phonics compared to other systems I've used. I was trained in JP under intensive training for nearly 2 months and I also taught it.

    Without going into detail of the merits of one system over another, my suggestion to parents is to really have a close look at the systems to see if it really does what it claims. I think once you've seen the research out there, you'll see why it doesn't fully work as well. That's not to say it doesn't work, but it doesn't work as well. I am quite immersed in the latest developments at International Kindergartens and have chatted with some principals and they are currently switching from JP to more proven and effective systems. All in all, phonics is phonics and you'll learn something, but there's just ways to learn better.

    And also a side note with British vs. American accents (not referring to spelling), some systems do work better than others. As I mentioned, JP and other systems from places like Cambridge and Oxford University Press follows British English more than American. Not major differences, but some.

    Hope that helps.



    -Ed
    Ed

    :yeah2

  7. #23
    elaine is offline Registered User
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    Ermm..so what other systems are there? Some leads would be helpful...

  8. #24
    HappyV is offline Registered User
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    What kind of 'English'? Southern, Northern?
    What kind of 'American'? Deep South, South Boston? North L.A.?

    At the end of the day, the phonice program itself is not as important as the quality of the teaching.

    Educator obvioulsy wants to recommend some systems over others - well, what are the 'good' systems, in your opinion?

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