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Adiri Natural Nurser

  1. #9
    rachrobin is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Wan Chai
    Posts
    101
    Thanks Bubbly,

    I guess i am just scared that for some reason I won't have any milk, or the baby will have trouble latching on. My mother didn't breastfeed and most of my friends with babies gave up pretty quickly.

    So, with the LLL meetings, pregnant mums are welcome? i just assumed you would need to wait until you had a baby to feed to join in!

  2. #10
    Smiles is offline Registered User
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    Mar 2008
    Location
    Happy Valley
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    193
    LLL hold prenatal meetings (I think you need to check their website for dates) I think it's a great idea as there seems to be so much info on breastfeeding it all gets a bit confusing!

  3. #11
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
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    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    757
    All women interested in breastfeeding are welcome to our meetings. We especially like pregnant mothers to come. I believe that there is great value in attending while you are pregnant. You get to see other mothers breastfeeding (not that common in our society). And for two hours you enter into a place where breastfeeding is the norm (also not common in our society).

    The article Why La Leche League? http://www.lalecheleague.org.nz/arti...che_league.htm
    gives a nice description of why our meetings may be helpful to attend.

    We also hold a Prenatal Breastfeeding Class, details at http://www.lllhk.org/Class.html especially for pregnant mothers and their partners.

    Best wishes,
    SARAH
    La Leche League Leader
    www.lllhk.org

  4. #12
    Tracey Nicole is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    245
    Rach re : Adiri Natural Nurser - i went to wingon and b2b to no avail. where can you buy?

  5. #13
    Bubbly is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    261

    Adiri

    Tracey Nicole,

    Adiri is only available online www.milk-factory.com or at CitySuper (Shatin & Times Square)

  6. #14
    cheriebuzz's Avatar
    cheriebuzz is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    North point
    Posts
    29
    hi bubbly. ;) for pumping breastmilk, when will the milk be ready to pump. Is that comes right after birth right? Most mom will generate milk when exactly? The symphony and the mini electric how much are they. whats the difference? i stay mostly at home so is it better to buy just either one of them will u recommend?

    for the sterilizer which one would u recommend to get? i would love to come over to see how u sterilise the bottle am kind of still not getting the whole picture yet!!

    thx for your useful suggestion i noted all down ;) can i have your msn? as u may be working dont want to ring u and disturb :)

  7. #15
    Tracey Nicole is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    245
    rach or gumbo :-0

    if you are purchasing, can you pick me one up? and what nipple/teat thingy you buy to go with it. i will pay you sunday. if that is a tall order - absolutely no drama rama.

    gee i feel like i really have to give up work...

    cheers,

    Trace xx

  8. #16
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    757
    Dear Cheriebuzz,

    The first milk you have starts when you are about four months pregnant. This is called colostrum. It is very good for your baby, see the article, What is colostrum? How does it benefit my baby?, http://www.llli.org//FAQ/colostrum.html

    Colostrum comes in very small amounts, the average feed is only 2 to 7 mls (remember that 5 mls is a teaspoon full). Colostrum comes one drop at a time. You can see this on a video from Dr. Jack Newman at http://www.thebirthden.com/Newman.html (Scroll down until you find the video clip entitled Poor Latch/Good Latch 2)

    As you can see colostrum comes just one drop at a time. I believe that this is so that the baby can learn how to coordinate the breathing with the sucking and swallowing with only tiny amounts. Imagine how uncomfortable the baby would get if he had a huge mouthful and it went down the wrong tube because he hasn't learnt the difference between breathing and eating yet.

    Colostrum is much thicker than water. The books describe it as gel-like but I think of it as honey - it is sticky and yellow like honey too. And because it is so thick and sticky it is very hard for a pump to get out of your body. Hand expression is usually much more productive in the first few days.

    But remember whether you can get any out or not you still have it. Think of a new jar of jam - just because you can't get the lid off you don't assume there is nothing in the jar. This is the same with colostrum - the baby is the best at getting the milk out and normally will manage where hand expressing and pumps fail.

    You continue to have colostrum for around two weeks but between the third and fifth day your milk supply increases - this is the mature milk starting. The mature milk is much thinner and whiter in colour. For the next 10 days you have a mixture of colostrum and mature milk, we call this transition milk.

    When the milk increases depends on how much breastfeeding you manage in the first two days. The more feeds you give the baby the quicker the milk will come in. We are aiming for at least 8 feeds every 24 hours. So skipping feeds, especially night feeds, tends to delay the milk coming in. Mothers who have to rely on expressing and pumping because the baby is ill also usually find that their milk is delayed because these aren't as good as a full-term healthy baby sucking directly.

    Some mothers find that after the milk supply has increased and the milk thinned that pumps work fine and others still find that hand expressing is better. By about two weeks most mothers find that the pump will work for them.

    But no pump is as good as a full-term healthy baby. We usually only suggest the use pumps if the baby isn't feeding well for some reason and the mother needs to help the baby stimulate her milk supply. If the baby is feeding well getting a full supply is much easier and better if the baby does the work.

    Around four to six weeks many things happen. The milk supply is full established and working well. The mother's milk ejection reflex is working beautifully and can compete with the flow from the bottle. The baby knows exactly how to feed and introducing other things (such as dummies and bottle teats) don't have a negative effect. Mother tend to have a confidence that everything is going well. When these things happen if you want to express and feed the baby with a bottle it doesn't have the negative effects that early pumping and bottles have.

    I'm sorry this is long but how breastfeeding works is actually quite complicated, anyway I hope this explains some of how breastfeeding works.

    Best wishes,
    SARAH
    La Leche League Leader
    www.lllhk.org

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