Forums  •  Classifieds  •  Events  •  Directory

 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

would you use warm breast milk again?

  1. #9
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    757
    It is generally accepted by lactation consultants that if you have heated the milk but not introduced it to the baby then you can cool the milk and place it in the fridge again and heat a second time - but I wouldn't heat it a third time.

    There is a good article which answer questions about milk storage by Dr. Ruth Lawrence called Storing Pumped Breastmilk at Storing Pumped Breastmilk - A Q&A Forum with Dr. Ruth Lawrence

    Best wishes,
    SARAH
    La Leche League Leader
    www.lllhk.org

  2. #10
    joannek is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    1,153
    i found the link
    kellymom.com :: Reusing expressed breastmilk

    Brusseau R. Bacterial Analysis of Refrigerated Human Milk Following Infant Feeding. May 1998.

    "Summary: The number of infants who are breastfed is on the rise, as is the number of women in the workforce. Many women who choose breastfeeding after returning to work, express milk during the day and store this milk for a future feeding. When infants do not finish a bottle of expressed breastmilk, doctors recommend unfinished portions be thrown away. This study examined bacterial levels in expressed, partially consumed breastmilk that was stored for 48 hours at 4-6? C. A portion of unconsumed milk was examined as a control. Samples were taken every 12 hours for bacterial analysis. Tests were performed to identify total colony counts, pathogenic Staphylococci, coliforms and b-hemolytic Streptococci. This study showed no significant difference between bottles that were partially consumed and those that were not exposed to the baby?s mouth for 5 out of 6 participants. All milk samples had colony counts in the acceptable range of < 105 colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml). Although this project provides evidence that it may be safe to refeed a child a bottle of breastmilk, due to the small sample size, further tests should be performed."

  3. #11
    aussiegal is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southside
    Posts
    660
    I remember being told that once you've heated milk you've got an hour to give it to the baby (whether they've started drinking or not). Heating the milk makes bacteria multiply or some such. I treat my ebm as liquid gold but always follow this rule.

  4. #12
    LLL_Sarah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    757
    The guidelines keep changing as more and more research is done on the subject.

    20 years ago the guidelines said to only keep expressed milk for 24 hours because this was the longest anyone had tested the milk. Now they have tested the milk for seven days and the guidelines say that you can keep the milk up to seven days. Maybe in the future they will test the milk for two weeks and then the guidelines could change again. After all they did find that after seven days the milk had fewer bacteria in it than when first pumped.

    Likewise I only know of one research (quoted by joannek by Brusseau) that looked at bacteria levels after the baby had drunk from the milk. The guidelines are usually only changed when a second or third research project gives the same results.

    In the past people thought of breast milk in a similar way to formula and so assumed it would go off as quickly - I think this is the reason that they started with 24 hours, then increase the guidelines to 48 and now it is at seven days. 20 years ago no one even considered that breast milk would last so long.

    But it is important to remember that formula is a dead liquid and so it is easy for the bacteria to increase, especially when kept at a warm temperature (bacteria love warmth).

    Breast milk, on the other hand, is a living liquid and the anti bacterial agents and antibodies in the milk keep working even after the milk is pumped out and stored. I believe it is these agents in the milk that make the bacterial counts so low even after the baby has drunk from the bottle and the milk been stored again. And remember the milk already has the antibodies for the bacteria that the baby has in his mouth.

    Some of the protective agents in the milk are destroyed when the milk is frozen and so the guidelines state to use any defrosted milk within 24 hours.

    More and more mothers want to continue breastfeeding and mix this with expressing and giving pumped milk to their babies. So I foresee more and more research on the topic of stored breast milk. I think that the guidelines are likely to change again in the future.

    Best wishes,
    SARAH
    Last edited by LLL_Sarah; 06-20-2009 at 01:36 PM.
    La Leche League Leader
    www.lllhk.org

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Switching from breast milk to cow'sr milk?
    By peainpod in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-03-2009, 11:16 PM
  2. OK to warm up fresh milk?
    By 1/3J in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-27-2008, 07:51 AM
  3. fisherprice flask for keeping milk warm
    By shahirakk in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-26-2008, 07:42 AM
  4. mixing breast milk and formula milk ?
    By Rosewood in forum Family Health
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-06-2005, 10:31 AM
  5. Breast Pump & Storing Breast Milk
    By Grace Bellis in forum Feeding Baby
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-24-2003, 08:34 PM

Tags for this Thread

Scroll to top