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Unnecesarean

  1. #9
    thanka2 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by carang View Post
    i agree that if possible we should try for a "natural" birth, however, i also worry about all the negativity surrounding having a c-section. i feel terrible that some women believe they are bad mothers because they weren't able to have their perfect (and planned on) natural delivery.

    it should all come down to the health and well being of mother and child. it shouldn't be anyone else's business, unless you make it theirs, how your child was brought into this world.

    my grandmother lost my mother's twin during that delivery and almsot lost herself. mostly because they didn't want to do a c-section. granted this was MANY years ago, but still....
    "

    The difference here is that many women are able to have a vaginal delivery but instead opt for a c-section because of lack of support in the system as well as lack of education about what a c-section is. These sites can provide information to those thinking about an elective c-section for whatever personal reason. It's about health and safety and a c-section doesn't always equal that for either mother or baby.

  2. #10
    starbucks2 is offline Registered User
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    Hi,

    I had a natural delivery but, to be honest, I have a lot of sympathy for women in HK who choose to have a c-section given that the law only gives them 10 weeks maternity leave. You have to finish work 2 weeks before your due date and if your baby is a week late then you have a mere 7 weeks with your newborn before you have to return to work. Who could blame a working mum-to-be who schedules her c-section the Sat after she finishes work to ensure she has her full 10 weeks with the baby?

    Something needs to be done about the law here in this regard. I am not suggesting necessarily that a UK approach is taken to allow a year off (albeit most unpaid) but I think we can all agree that 10 weeks is ridiculously short.

    SB2

  3. #11
    sherwes is offline Registered User
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    I think the key issue here is that women are entitled to be provided with the information they need to make an informed decision regarding the kind of birth experience they want. This applies whether the mother wishes to have a home birth, natural birth in a hospital, natural birth with pain relief or c-section. Websites like these can be a helpful adjunct to medical advice and can also assist women in asking the "right" questions of their doctors.

    Personally, I have had 2 c-sections, two healthy babies and no regrets. Just as I am sure that anyone who has had 2 natural births with the same results has no regrets. My sister had an unassisted home birth (in Australia) and loved the whole experience. She even had her older children present through the whole birth. Now, that is something I would never do (just as my sister thought I was a Martian for having a c-section!).

    I can't agree more with Starbucks2 that the maternity leave laws in HK need to change to allow women to be able to choose to spend more time with their newborns without fearing losing their jobs. I am extremely lucky to work for an Australian company in this regard.

  4. #12
    HappyV is offline Registered User
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    The 10 weeks maternity leave causes so many health problems for women and children in HK: it's not enough time to recover from a C-section, physically or mentally; it's not enough time to establish good breastfeeding (and is one reason why we have such a low breastfeeding rate); and it's certainly not enough time for a family to settle into theor new life (i.e. older children getting used to the baby before mum goes back to work).

    Flexi time!

    I agree that women need more information than what the HK medical profession likes to give.

    I've had two emergency CS - both for medical reasons after high risk pregnancies - so I have no qualms about my births.

  5. #13
    AndreaY is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by thanka2 View Post
    Hence the word "misinformation"--it comes in all sorts of packages--and the underlying assumption that girds up (pun intended) the overuse of c-sections is the myth that they are no big deal physically. The truth is a c-section is a major abdominal surgery that carries with it a greater risk to mother and baby than most situations associated with vaginal birth. Yes, women make the choice to have elective c-sections for all sorts of reasons. In my opinion, most of them do not justify such a procedure but at any rate, as I said, these two sites provide some more information to consider for those considering an elective c-section.
    I read one of the articles and the blame of "unnecesarean" was mostly on obs. I was merely pointing out that there are lots more reasons that some women choose c-section and it has not much to do with the coercion of the obs. It is a personal choice and it does not mean they were "misinformed" in any way. I chose 2 natural births with no epidurals, but that does not mean I am more informed and chose better than those who chose otherwise.

    I personally am not a believer of fung shiu/chinese fortune telling, but to those who believe, it's like religion (the argument of it being thousands and thousands of years of study). But dismissing someone's following of ancient chinese beliefs as "misinformation" is a little condescending.

    I also know of situations where the mothers decided to have elective c-section on public holidays, cos that's when the husbands do not have to work and can also be there. That's a sad result of the tough hong kong work environment, but it's reality for some.

    If I have another, I would definitely go for natural again, but for my cousin who had 1 emergency and 1 elective c-section, I think she would have things to say about the "Yes, women make the choice to have elective c-sections for all sorts of reasons. In my opinion, most of them do not justify such a procedure".

    Guess what I am saying is, for those who succumbed to coercion from the obs in chosing elective c-section, the articles would give them something to think about. But for those who chose for above reasons stated, they in the end only want the best for their child and their family (ie good life, early bonding with daddy etc.).

  6. #14
    miao is offline Registered User
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    In this regard, could you ladies recommend an OB in Hong Kong who has a reputation of promoting natural delivery, especially one after a previous c-section?

    I had an emergency c-section for my first baby, which in retrospect seemed to be (at least partly) the result of an unnecessary induction suggested by my OB. I had really wanted a natural birth instead, and am hoping that for my second baby I can be with a doctor who's willing to support me on a VBAC. So any suggestion please?

    Thanks a lot!

  7. #15
    Shenzhennifer is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by thanka2 View Post
    "

    The difference here is that many women are able to have a vaginal delivery but instead opt for a c-section because of lack of support in the system as well as lack of education about what a c-section is. These sites can provide information to those thinking about an elective c-section for whatever personal reason. It's about health and safety and a c-section doesn't always equal that for either mother or baby.
    It`s funny because after my own unexpected c-section, I was horrified that anyone would choose it. I don`t know if I was uninformed or not, but like most people, just didn`t seem to think I would end up having to have one. I think it was truly awful (regardless of the beautiful result) and painful and the recovery was long. Having said that, I have no idea what women go through who have particularly grueling labours and births.

    The thing that annoys me though, is that there seems to be a certain stigma attached to it, and people are generally shocked when I tell them I had my son through a c-section, as if I elected to have it, or could have stopped it. And as if I was naively taken advantage of by a calculating doctor.
    I don`t know if I would go through the trouble of `fighting for` a VBAC the next time around, but I`m disappointed that I will probably have to have another. Now that I am informed:)

  8. #16
    starbucks2 is offline Registered User
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    Just to add to the breastfeeding point - it can be maintained even after going back to work so quickly but it does require a lot of commitment and effort. I went back to work after 12 weeks and kept up breastfeeding until my baby was 10 months old. I needed to "pump and dump" twice at work during the day and we had no room to express in so needed to use the bathroom (hence dumping of the milk). I was at least lucky to go back 3 days a week so the inconvenience of having to express at work twice a day only needed to be done on 3 days.

    SB2

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