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Reducing Infant Mortality

  1. #57
    thanka2 is offline Registered User
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    “Many women have described their experiences of childbirth as being associated with a
    spiritual uplifting, the power of which they have never previously been aware …
    To such a woman childbirth is a monument of joy within her memory.
    She turns to it in thought to seek again an ecstasy which passed too soon.”

    ~ Grantly Dick-Read (Childbirth Without Fear)

    Mother of Two
    JMW, boy, born November 29, 2007, 9:43 pm, USA
    MJW, girl, born March 17, 2011, 4:14 pm, HK

  2. #58
    thanka2 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gataloca View Post
    As for the stress, I read or heard somewhere that each contraction is not only painful for the mother, but also for the baby, as he get pushed through the birth canal. It may be more difficult for my baby due to the cephalopelvic disproportion. Forceps doesn't sound fun either. This was going to be my first one, and we know that usually it takes longer time for the first one to come out... and we are not talking about how his little head may get stuck on the birth canal! Also my sister got induced at week 42, and after long hours of pain, she didn't dilate enough and had to go for an emergency C section. So I didn't want to suffer in vain. I really wish labor were like in the movies! On the movies, they are always fast!
    It's total misinformation that vaginal birth, in itself is stressful or more harmful/painful for a baby than a c-section. There are many benefits of the labor process for baby and mother and some are listed below.

    The fact that your sister was induced set her up for a c-section. It is a well-known phenomenon that women who go in to be induced often end up with a c-section because basically they are forcing their bodies into labor before the cervix is really ready--it is not surprising that she didn't dilate. That c-section was an emergency that might have been prevented by not inducing and waiting for the body to go into labor naturally. There are a lot of "man-made" (doctor-made) emergencies happening in the labor and delivery departments of the world for this very reason.

    In the movies labor is made out to be this horrifying and catastrophic event that women need doctors to rescue them from. Just like most things in Hollywood--couldn't be further from the truth. And it needn't be that way.

    Vaginal Birth Benefits for Baby
    from here.

    1.

    Babies born naturally are usually born when they are ready. Elective caesareans typically take place a week or two before the expected due date. However, many babies if left to be born naturally are born at 41 or 42 weeks. If there was any miscalculation, a baby removed surgically could be at risk for prematurity and encounter respiratory problems as a result of under-developed lungs.

    2.

    Babies born by vaginal birth have considerable lower risk of respiratory problems. The compression of the baby’s thorax expels the amniotic fluid during the birth process and helps to prepare the lungs to breathe air. There is a high risk of respiratory distress syndrome in babies born by cesarean and a high risk of asthma.1
    3.

    The passage through the birth canal stimulates the baby’s cardiovascular system, which boosts blood circulation and primes the baby for birth. There is evidence that this process also has long term benefits for the baby’s co-ordination. Cranial osteopaths are reported to be able to determine whether a baby was born vaginally or by caesarean.

    4.

    Babies born vaginally receive protective bacteria as they pass through the birth canal. These bacteria colonise in the intestine and are crucial for developing a balanced immune system, from childhood right through to adulthood.2

    5.

    During a natural, vaginal birth babies benefit from hormonal surges in catecholamines during labor, which results in them being more alert and able to connect with their mothers at birth.3

    6.

    Similarly, endorphins, nature’s ‘feel-good hormones, which are secreted during an unmedicated childbirth have been found in the placenta and umbilical cord. These hormones may help the baby adjust to life outside the womb as well as make the birth passage more comfortable for baby.

    7.

    Babies born by vaginal birth exhibit more interest in pre-breastfeeding behaviours such as sucking and massaging the mother's breasts. They are also reported to nurse for longer periods within the first 90 minutes after birth, which has many benefits for both the mother and the baby.
    8.

    A European study in 2008 found that babies born vaginally had a 20% lower risk of developing type 1 diabetes than babies born surgically.

    9.

    The process of labor is reported to enable babies born vaginally to cope with stress better than those born dramatically by cesarean. Cesarean birth triggers a dramatic stress response which could set up a child to always over-respond to stress.4

    10.

    If the vaginal birth was drug-free, the baby will not experience any side-effects of medication administered during the process.
    11.

    Skin-to-skin contact between the mother and baby can occur easily after a natural birth. This has many physiological benefits to the baby including optimal brain development as well as better attachment and breastfeeding success.
    12.

    Newborns are less likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit if delivered vaginally.
    “Many women have described their experiences of childbirth as being associated with a
    spiritual uplifting, the power of which they have never previously been aware …
    To such a woman childbirth is a monument of joy within her memory.
    She turns to it in thought to seek again an ecstasy which passed too soon.”

    ~ Grantly Dick-Read (Childbirth Without Fear)

    Mother of Two
    JMW, boy, born November 29, 2007, 9:43 pm, USA
    MJW, girl, born March 17, 2011, 4:14 pm, HK

  3. #59
    thanka2 is offline Registered User
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    “Many women have described their experiences of childbirth as being associated with a
    spiritual uplifting, the power of which they have never previously been aware …
    To such a woman childbirth is a monument of joy within her memory.
    She turns to it in thought to seek again an ecstasy which passed too soon.”

    ~ Grantly Dick-Read (Childbirth Without Fear)

    Mother of Two
    JMW, boy, born November 29, 2007, 9:43 pm, USA
    MJW, girl, born March 17, 2011, 4:14 pm, HK

  4. #60
    MommyTo3 is offline Registered User
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    I thought that was a very good article. I am all for intervention when needed, but the bottom line is that there should be NO intervention unless medically necessary. Doctors shouldn't push, mothers shouldn't ask! I know a lot of doctors want to schedule things, but way too often I have heard moms whining about the fact that they're soooooo tired, and they're pushing their doctors for c-sections or inductions at 37 weeks (which is just an estimate in the end) since it's full term! That's just absolutely crazy. And then they give birth to a 6-7 pound baby, wow!? What's 2, 3, 4 weeks more if there is no medical reason to do anything, when mom and baby are doing just fine?! Isn't there a reason the baby isn't coming out? The difference in outcome between a 37 and 39+ weeker are substantial.

    I have 3 children. Oldest was born naturally 9 days late at 9lbs2oz. With the twins I was induced at 38w2d, because most doctors believe there the risks start outweighing the benefits with multiples past 38 weeks. Plus I was being monitored for having blood clots in my legs since one leg was severely swollen, but nothing was found at 36 and 37 weeks. They were born naturally and were close to 8lbs (almost 3500 grams each) and came home with me 2 days later. Leg was back to normal within 6 hours after giving birth (weight issue pushing on some blood vessels). Of course, it wasn't great, it was tiring, I didn't sleep much after 32 weeks (they were estimated 9lbs combined at 30 weeks), but what can you do? You make the best of it. You do what you need to do, you go on, for the sake of your children, because you never want to regret anything.

  5. #61
    Gataloca's Avatar
    Gataloca is offline Registered User
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    I think everything is a matter of common sense.... and of course, if you trust your doctor. We all know that natural is best, but if there is any condition that may affect the course of a natural delivery, then it worth weighting the pros and the cons.*

    It is good to know what one wants, but being too inflexible can put one, the baby and the whole medical staff at risk. If for example, if one knows that the baby is breech, and one insists in having a normal delivery because one has heard that it is possible for the baby to engage at the last minute, is putting herself in a risky position of having a very complicated labor that may require emergency intervention. *

    Once I was talking with my doctor about something (don't remember exactly what) and I told him that I was confused because now a day we have access to too much information, and much of those are contradictory. *The doctor said that he agreed, and that the difference between what people hear over the Internet and what he says, is that the guys who say things over the Internet do not need to take responsibility for what they posted, but he, as the doctor, has to.

    So bottom line, just use you common sense and decide by yourself. *Discuss your options with you doctor and go for a second opinion if needed. **
    Posted via Mobile Device

  6. #62
    thanka2 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gataloca View Post
    I think everything is a matter of common sense.... and of course, if you trust your doctor. We all know that natural is best, but if there is any condition that may affect the course of a natural delivery, then it worth weighting the pros and the cons.*

    It is good to know what one wants, but being too inflexible can put one, the baby and the whole medical staff at risk. If for example, if one knows that the baby is breech, and one insists in having a normal delivery because one has heard that it is possible for the baby to engage at the last minute, is putting herself in a risky position of having a very complicated labor that may require emergency intervention. *

    Once I was talking with my doctor about something (don't remember exactly what) and I told him that I was confused because now a day we have access to too much information, and much of those are contradictory. *The doctor said that he agreed, and that the difference between what people hear over the Internet and what he says, is that the guys who say things over the Internet do not need to take responsibility for what they posted, but he, as the doctor, has to.

    So bottom line, just use you common sense and decide by yourself. *Discuss your options with you doctor and go for a second opinion if needed. **
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Just wanted to add that the online sources I've posted above are no less trustworthy because they happen to be online. Nowadays, anyone who has ever done any academic research or work, knows that most resources are not found in leather-bound books on a dusty library bookshelf anymore. Most information is posted online in one form or another. The key is to know if the information is authoritative or not. Particularly, concerning the information regarding the benefits of vaginal childbirth for mother and baby, although I posted the information above from a website, I first read this information in a book that was written by a well-known doctor who boasted a career of over 50 years studying and overseeing literally thousands of successful, natural and unmedicated chilbirths. He is an authoritative source.

    In an age where information is so easily available, there is no reason for educated women to not seek out more information than their doctor simply provides. I agree in seeking a second opinion but disagree that the only information of authority or value is that that comes from an OBGYN. That's a pretty limited view of things. I just happen to believe that, given the correct information, I'm just as capable of making decisions as my OBGYN is of making them for me.

    Doctors hold biases based on their experience and education. If you watch the documentary, "The Business of Being Born" you will see OBGYNs who were questioned saying that they never had the opportunity to actually attend a birth in which the woman gave birth naturally without the use of drugs. These same doctors have also never been taught any maneuvers (besides c-sections) to safely deliver a breech baby. Whereas, this is a standard part of training for midwives and many breech babies are safely delivered this way. It's a question of education and experience. As the above mentioned documentary points out, OBGYNs are primarily trained as surgeons so they are usually very good at performing c-sections but not so good at handling normal births.

    This means, that their actual experience is limited--they may believe that there is only one type of birth simply because that is what their experience is.

    There is a huge difference between being inflexible and being committed. Sometimes you have to commit (through education and preparation as well as mentally) to something in order to see it through (natural childbirth)--you also need to prepare physically and mentally for it. But, every midwife that oversees a birth as well as most people who are advocates of natural, unmedicated childbirth (me, for example) also have a back-up plan/escape route--we would be unwise not to. That doesn't mean that at the slight drop of a hat we throw out all of our plans just "in case" something "might" happen. That's not being committed, in my opinion. It's not an all-or-nothing sort of mindset. We just choose to be active participants in our births from conception through after the baby is born.
    Last edited by thanka2; 02-19-2011 at 10:57 PM.

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