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dressing baby

  1. #9
    Gracey is offline Registered User
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    They tell you that because they still believe these ridiculous superstitions about "wind". I've been hearing about "wind" my whole life. It's the reason (allegedly) that you can't drink anything cold and or why pregnant ladies like myself have to cut our long hair -- in case we don't blow-dry it and "wind" enters our heads. Never mind that it's 33 degrees outside.

    It's all hogwash. I drink cold things every day and I never blow-dry my long hair. And I almost never get colds, flus or headaches. Our secretary at work wraps up in winter fleeces all summer -- including neck scarf -- takes endless Chinese medicine to get rid of "wind", refuses to drink even a Coke and is still sick constantly. Honestly, I think it's all in people's heads.

    It's why you see these poor local tykes sweating it out in a hat, jacket and mittens in the Hong Kong summer. I'm SO looking forward to having a baby. I'm SO not looking forward to having to argue with Chinese aunties over this stuff when she comes.

  2. #10
    catan is offline Registered User
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    The back of my baby's neck is usually hot, as is her body. It's usually her hands and feet that are slightly cool when in a/c areas. Not cool enough to worry me though. But with so many people telling me about this I started to wonder if I was missing something.


    Quote Originally Posted by nicolejoy View Post
    It's pretty easy to tell if a baby is too hot or too cold - just feel the back of their neck. If it's nice and toasty, they're fine. If their hands and feet are a bit cold, they might like a light jacket. But if they're pretty warm, don't bother. And if they're sweaty, or if their hands and feet are really hot, then they're probably overheating!! A LOT of babies over here are completely overdressed, and not only is it uncomfortable for them, but it can also cause some (minor) developmental delays since it is harder for them to move around.

  3. #11
    catan is offline Registered User
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    Yup, my mother is constantly on my case about 'wind.' During my confinement period everyone was on my case about wearing long sleeves, long pants, and socks. In this weather!! I don't blow dry my hair either and kept it long during pregnancy. It worked out just fine for me! I wasn't supposed to drink water for a month after childbirth, but I did (you get sooo thirsty when breastfeeding) and nothing happened, lol. My mom and all my aunties claim it's something you can't understand until I get older and regret it.

    Whenever I leave my daughter with my mother for an hour, I find her swaddled in non a/c room and heating up!

    Interestingly, my husband who's from India thinks it's good to keep the baby only in diapers without a/c, and finds the idea of wrapping the baby up in a blanket strange. It's not common over there.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gracey View Post
    They tell you that because they still believe these ridiculous superstitions about "wind". I've been hearing about "wind" my whole life. It's the reason (allegedly) that you can't drink anything cold and or why pregnant ladies like myself have to cut our long hair -- in case we don't blow-dry it and "wind" enters our heads. Never mind that it's 33 degrees outside.

    It's all hogwash. I drink cold things every day and I never blow-dry my long hair. And I almost never get colds, flus or headaches. Our secretary at work wraps up in winter fleeces all summer -- including neck scarf -- takes endless Chinese medicine to get rid of "wind", refuses to drink even a Coke and is still sick constantly. Honestly, I think it's all in people's heads.

    It's why you see these poor local tykes sweating it out in a hat, jacket and mittens in the Hong Kong summer. I'm SO looking forward to having a baby. I'm SO not looking forward to having to argue with Chinese aunties over this stuff when she comes.

  4. #12
    Lali07 is offline Registered User
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    I grew up in the tropics, and most of my baby photos I am wearing only a nappy! My mum never swaddled me or overdressed me, we were running around in just our underpants a lot of the time because it was so hot... Aside from the usual childhood illnesses like chickenpox, we didn't get sick much.

    Because I dress my baby mostly in just onesies, I get stared at by the old ladies who probably think I am neglectful hehe... I think overdressing and overheating is far more of a health risk.. Thats the view where I come from anyway.

  5. #13
    catan is offline Registered User
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    I get those stares too, especially from older people. Firstly, disapproving of my going outside with a young baby, and then the fact that her arms and legs aren't covered up. I worry more about baby overheating than not wearing enough.


    Quote Originally Posted by Lali07 View Post
    I grew up in the tropics, and most of my baby photos I am wearing only a nappy! My mum never swaddled me or overdressed me, we were running around in just our underpants a lot of the time because it was so hot... Aside from the usual childhood illnesses like chickenpox, we didn't get sick much.

    Because I dress my baby mostly in just onesies, I get stared at by the old ladies who probably think I am neglectful hehe... I think overdressing and overheating is far more of a health risk.. Thats the view where I come from anyway.

  6. #14
    AudreysMom is offline Registered User
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    As a rule of thumb, an infant needs one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear at the same temperature. Checking the back of her neck is good advice. Hands are a terrible indicator (too many variables). If her neck is cold--she is definitely cold! If her neck is really sweaty, and especially if her cheeks are red or hot, too--she's definitely too hot. I have found that when the back of her neck is pleasantly warm, she always seems comfortable

  7. #15
    KeHK is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gracey View Post
    It's why you see these poor local tykes sweating it out in a hat, jacket and mittens in the Hong Kong summer. I'm SO looking forward to having a baby. I'm SO not looking forward to having to argue with Chinese aunties over this stuff when she comes.
    Wait till it's winter and the comments get even worse... I remember a time in January when it was around 12 degrees Celsius and I was told on the street that it was too cold to bring my baby (then 2 months old) out, even though I had dressed her accordingly. And that's just 1 example of many many more...

  8. #16
    catan is offline Registered User
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    Apparently, people in HK don't bring their babies out. They always say (somewhat rudely) "how can you take a baby that young out?" And everyone feels the need to tell me to put socks and a hat on her!

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