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Documents for New Baby

  1. #9
    Ruza is offline Registered User
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    Thanks Bonita. I think there is some flexibility with this. At the same time I posted hee, I sent an email to the Immig Dept and this is their reply:

    "Upon birth registration, parents may choose to register the baby's name on their own desire. You may put up your request to registration officer's consideration."

    Not exactly a firm committment but also not an outright "no way."!

    As inkmink seems to say below, the Chinese given name can include a character that is the mother's surname.

  2. #10
    Ruza is offline Registered User
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    Thanks Bonita. I also emailed the Immig Dept with this question and they replied:

    "Upon birth registration, parents may choose to register the baby's name on their own desire. You may put up your request to registration officer's consideration."

    Not a firm committment but also not a "no way".

    As inkmink seems to say below, the first charachter in the three entered as the Chinese given names can be the mother's surname.

    (Phew -- as if naming a baby wasn't mind-bending enough!)

  3. #11
    Gemma is offline Registered User
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    I did the same as inkmink. My husband doesn't have a formal Chinese surname. My dad thought of one for him over a meal of Peking duck!

    Also, in your context you really only need to have an English name (surname will be yours obviously) within a certain amount of time. You can take your time with the Chinese name. We only finally decided on a Chinese name for our son after 12 months (I know - pathetic) and I have yet to add it to his birth certificate. Think it's $180 to add a name or something.

  4. #12
    inkmink is offline Registered User
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    Ruza - you can put whatever you like as said by Nicolejoy. Yes, my daughter 's given Chinese name on birth cert has 3 characters including my surname. The hk birth cert's chinese name section also doesn't have a surname box like the English section. Because of this, they had to show the Chinese surname in the Chinese given name section and "treat it" as a Chinese given name ONLY on the birth cert.

    The registrar told me to explain to hk immigration if I encounter any problems. So far, I haven't have the need to explain to anyone. I have applied hkid, hk passport, home return permit as well as bringing daughter out of hk a couple of times.

    For home return permit, yes, they require Chinese name and the form has to be filled in Chinese including address!
    Last edited by inkmink; 09-05-2011 at 12:13 AM. Reason: Add more info

  5. #13
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    nicolejoy is offline Registered User
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    One thing that I HAVE heard of is that if you choose a "non-traditional" romanisation of the Chinese name, you need to sign that you know that it's spelt "wrong" and you choose to have it spelt that way. I also have friends who did that for various reasons, and it was ok, they just had to acknowledge that it was not spelt the conventional way... not sure if that's relevant to you or not though!!

  6. #14
    evgreen is offline Registered User
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    Hi Nicole joy...might be a silly question but how do I indicate this to immigration? I might want my daughters Chinese name romanized in pinyin mandarin instead of Cantonese....

  7. #15
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    nicolejoy is offline Registered User
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    I think that pinyin or cantonese are both fine with the birth certificate place - just if you want it spelt "uniquely" for whatever reason... one of my friends chose a Chinese name which sounded similar to an English name which is not spelt how it should be romanised in either Mandarin or Cantonese - and it was in that situation that they needed to sign off that they knew it wasn't how it should be romanised. Another friend chose a name which looked funny in English, so they spelt it differently, more how an English speaker would pronounce it, and less "rude" looking... and they also had to sign off on it. It's no big deal, they just want to make sure that you know what you're naming your kid. Now if only they would do that for all the poor Chinese kids called something like "Milk" or "Demon" out there...

  8. #16
    miran is offline Registered User
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    Dont know if this is relevant; but a few of our freinds have given their kids surnames which are not the surname their dads (respectively) carry. At the time of applying for birth certificate you have to put in this request - and firmly. They allot you a senior officer and if there is a reason enough the officer agrees.

    However, in all the cases I know of the parents belonged to a part of India where traditionally children take father's first name as the surname.

    Apologies if this is completely usless info :)

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