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What do you wish you could have brought to Hong Kong?

  1. #1
    bkrent is offline Registered User
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    What do you wish you could have brought to Hong Kong?

    We have two little kids, including a baby, and are moving soon to Hong Kong. Our moving expenses will be paid for. What do you recommend that we bring? Especially for anyone from the U.S., are there things that you took for granted back home that is just not available, or much more expensive, or just not the same quality there? (e.g., should I stock up on BPA-free food holders? Would it be silly to ship over the organic baby food I trust, as well as my older one's favorite goldfish crackers in bulk?)

  2. #2
    Gemma is offline Registered User
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    I saw these huge boxes of goldfish crackers (cheddar cheese or something) and I'm pretty sure it's from the US at 360, so if it's the same thing, your son is set. I'll have a look and confirm the name next time I go.

  3. #3
    howardcoombs is offline Registered User
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    Goldfish (in multitude of flavours) is widely available in Hong Kong. I wouldn't bother with them. Bring a nice crib if you have one (nice ones are very expensive here), bring a buggy/stroller but only if its not one of those giant ones. Hong Kong is a small place and a big stroller makes for big hassles.

  4. #4
    thanka2 is offline Registered User
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    When I first moved here long-term (as I've been in and out of Hong Kong for over 10 years but have been living here continuously for about 6) there were a lot of "creature comforts" I wished I stocked up on (like you mentioned goldfish crackers). But, nowadays a lot of those can be located (sometimes requires a bit of searching) somewhere in Hong Kong (yes, we do have goldfish crackers). The big difference you'll find is price. We've got lots of luxury shopping here in Hong Kong and when it comes to baby and children's stuff, there's no exception. So, those BPA-free food holders will be available but you may have to pay 3-5 times more to buy them here in Hong Kong. Of course, this depends on a lot of things including brand-name and how rare the item is.

    Nowadays, the things I wish I could easily get from the States include:

    -Clothes. For myself--I don't have the proportions of a Chinese woman and I find that the standard places to buy "foreigner" clothes--especially dress clothes are extremely expensive for me...having said that I've found a few export clothes outlet stores that carry non-brandname nice dress/business clothes that I go to for my work clothes...it just takes a lot more time and effort in Hong Kong to "source" items. There is rarely one-stop shopping for anything in Hong Kong--also, not having a car and getting around everywhere by public transport makes shopping a big headache sometimes. Also, the styles here in HK are vastly different from the States so if you like a particular brand or fit of clothes, I say, bring extra.

    -Shoes--again, I have large feet so forget trying to find womens' shoes that are 1) well-made 2) affordable and 3) attractive in Hong Kong. But, I have had some shoes made for me at a shoe shop here for about $50 USD. They aren't exactly well-made and don't last for years but they work. The thing I have problems finding are cute athletic shoes. Of course, I can wear men's shoes but that gets old after 6 years. I've been literally laughed out of Hong Kong shoe shops when I show them my shoe size and ask if they have anything for women. I've also been handed hideous men's loafers like, "Sorry, honey, this is all we could come up with." So, anytime I go to the States I STOCK UP on shoes. And I can wear out a pair of shoes every 6 months in Hong Kong because I just walk so much here compared with the States. Having said that, I know some women buy their shoes online and have them shipped. For me, because of how my feet are, it's not so simple so I need to try a shoe on first to know if it fits.

    -Health items--especially supplements. I use a supplement called chorella. I looked for over a year for chorella tablets in Hong Kong with no success. Finally, when my sister came for a visit I had her bring some with her. So, this type of thing would be available at any high-quality health food store in the States or if not, online. However, I've heard that there is a website out of Thailand called iHerb that carries certain products like that (although, I don't think they have chorella).

    In the end, I'd say that when it comes down to it, the biggest issues is cost. You can get most things here in HK but you're going to have to pay much more for them than you're used to in the States and it's likely you're going to have to run all over the place to find what you need. But, by all means, if you have a favorite food (such as a tea or coffee that you like) then bring a little extra. Or, if you want to see what Hong Kong has to offer as far as food items go to this website: http://www1.parknshop.com/WebShop/GuestVisitpage.do After you login as a guest then do a browse through their items. This is one of the biggest grocery chains in Hong Kong (they deliver for free if you buy more than $65 USD worth of food--we have food delivered about twice a month). It will give you an idea of what is commonly available--although there are other chains such as Taste, 360 and CitySuper that will have hard-to-find items sometimes.

    After living here this long I've come to realize that most of the things I want are kind of passing fancies and aren't as important as I thought they were. If you have a good food processor, blender, juicer, breadmaker--those types of things, although you can get them in Hong Kong, I recommend bringing your own.

    Hope these things help. :)
    “Many women have described their experiences of childbirth as being associated with a
    spiritual uplifting, the power of which they have never previously been aware …
    To such a woman childbirth is a monument of joy within her memory.
    She turns to it in thought to seek again an ecstasy which passed too soon.”

    ~ Grantly Dick-Read (Childbirth Without Fear)

    Mother of Two
    JMW, boy, born November 29, 2007, 9:43 pm, USA
    MJW, girl, born March 17, 2011, 4:14 pm, HK

  5. #5
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    carang is offline Registered User
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    you can also look at http://www.anmhongkong.com (i think that's the right website). they source out of the states and while they don't have everything you'd be used to, they do carry some great "treats".

  6. #6
    penguinsix is offline Registered User
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    A&M (yes, carang got the right website address) and Gateway are two 'Costco' importers basically. They go over to Costco, buy a ton of stuff, and then resell it here for a decent markup. Great if you miss Kirkland Cashews and Peanuts in those big boxes, and also good around Halloween to get box boxes of US candy.

  7. #7
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    carang is offline Registered User
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    from them, i like:
    -different cake mixes than what is normally available
    -fruit flavoured water
    -bread flour (in the big bags)
    -cheez-it crackers (my kids love them!)
    -big jars of dill pickles (cheaper to buy from them than at the supermarket)
    -alphagetti etc (occasional treat for the kids)
    -fruit roll ups
    -reese's peanut butter cups
    -coloured mini marshmallows
    -dog biscuits (overall cheaper than the supermarket)
    -a & w rootbeer

    Prizemart also does mixed nuts (cheaper than anm)

  8. #8
    howardcoombs is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by thanka2 View Post
    If you have a good food processor, blender, juicer, breadmaker--those types of things, although you can get them in Hong Kong, I recommend bringing your own.
    All kinds of good advice from Thanka2 except for the quote above.
    HKG is 220V while USA is 110. For anything that has big heater&motor, you will need a big transformer to change the voltage. These beasts are big and ugly at best and can be dangerious and unsafe at worst.
    If your appliance is dual voltage (most electronics and computers etc are) then by all means bring them.
    Most motorized appliances will not be dual voltage and I would recommend selling or donating them. Bringing those here will not be very practical.


    https://www.google.com/search?q=110+...NsalrQHunfHJBQ

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